ABSOLUTELY QUEBEC

New documentary explores 1970s battle for Quebec's North

Watch the dramatic story of how the Inuit and Cree of northern Quebec took on Quebec's plans to build massive hydroelectric dams in the early 1970s, in a race to protect their land and their children's future.

Cree and Inuit signatories tell story of 1975 James Bay Agreement in Ole Gjerstad's new documentary

NAPAGUNNAQULLUSI: So That You Can Stand airs as part of CBC's Absolutely Quebec documentary series. (Studio Pascal Blais)

Napagunnaqullusi — So That You Can Stand tells the dramatic story of the 11 Inuit signatories of the James Bay Agreement.

In the 1970s, they were among the Inuit and Cree leaders who took on the Quebec government and its plan to build massive hydroelectric dams on their traditional territories, in order to protect their land and their children's future.

The documentary by director Ole Gjerstad examines the legacy — positive and negative — of the activism work done by both Inuit and Cree community members in the 1970s and how it influences their relations with the Quebec government today.

Charlie and Johnny Watt were two of the Inuit leaders who led the campaign against the massive hydroelectric projects Quebec began building in the 1970s on Inuit and Cree traditional lands. (Courtesy of Makivik Corporation)

Napagunnaqullusi - So That You Can Stand airs this Saturday at 7 p.m. and will be available to watch online at watch.cbc.ca as part of the Absolutely Quebec series.