Neonicotinoids to be targeted in Quebec's new pesticide rules

Quebec Environment Minister David Heurtel is expected to present a new strategy Sunday to better control the use of pesticides — particularly neonicotinoids, a class of insecticide considered to be partly responsible for drastic reductions in bee populations.

Neuro-active insecticide considered to be major contributor to bee-colony collapse

Neonicotinoids are considered to be harmful to bees, as well as some other species. (Andy Duback/The Associated Press)

Quebec Environment Minister David Heurtel is expected to present a new strategy Sunday to better control the use of pesticides — particularly neonicotinoids, a class of insecticide considered to be partly responsible for drastic reductions in bee populations.

According to information obtained by Radio-Canada, the province plans to ban some insecticides from being used in urban areas, as well as greatly restrict their use in agricultural settings.

The new measures will attempt to modernize Quebec's laws on pesticides, which date back to 1987.

Quebec Environment Minister David Heurtel is expected to roll out a new policy regulating the use of pesticides. (Jacques Boissinot/Canadian Press)

Bees in particular have fallen victim to the presence of neonicotinoids — a class of neuro-active insecticide that has similar chemical properties to nicotine — in both urban and rural settings.

Neonicotinoids are believed to be a major contributor to bee-colony collapse and other problems related to the bee population. Birds and fish are also considered to be vulnerable to pesticide contamination.

According to information obtained by Radio-Canada, the Quebec government's strategy will propose that the use of all "risky" pesticides will need to be supervised and approved by an agronomist.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.