NDG's Head & Hands relocates to more accessible location

The organization that provides health and social services to youth packed up its Sherbrooke Street location and moved to the former site of the Benny Library.

Youth services group moves from Sherbrooke location to nearby Benny Street

Head & Hands' young parent program, which has never been in the same physical space as the other programs, will join the services in the main building for the first time in its 30. (CBC)

Head & Hands has packed up its Sherbrooke Street location and moved to the former site of the Benny Library, on Benny Street.

The new space guarantees privacy for those accessing medical services, while allowing for a collaborative work environment for employees, Head & Hands organizers say.

It's also far more accessible.

"Before, the health clinic used to be on the second floor," said Andrea Clarke, executive director of Head & Hands.

"We could offer services to our clients on the first floor, but we didn't even have a ramp to get into the building."

The medical wing and all other services are accessible by ramp, and the entire Head & Hands team is on the same floor, making it easier to offer referrals. (CBC)

Now, the medical wing and all other services are accessible by ramp, and the entire Head & Hands team is on the same floor, making it easier to point people to other corners of the organization, she said.

And the young parent program, which has never been in the same building as the other programs, will join the services under the same roof for the first time in its 30 years of existence.

'A radical improvement'

Though the square footage is the same as the Sherbrooke location, organizers say the new one presents a big improvement.

"People are elated," Clarke said. "Being in this space means we will continue to be able to serve our community for decades to come."

The organization has had a huge impact on some community members, like Lenin Aular, who first came to Head & Hands nine months ago.

He stopped by for their food pantry service, and later, came for counselling.

"I realized that I could talk to the people there, you know, I could talk to them about my life, my experiences, how I was feeling. And they would always be there, open-minded, and listen to you."

Aular now volunteers at Head & Hands.

With files from Matt D'Amours