A Notre-Dame-de-Grâce resident is trying to make sense of a ticket he received for not locking his car.

Cegep teacher Sami Massoud woke up Friday morning to find a ticket on the dashboard of his car for $57.00.

The time on the ticket indicated that it had been filled out 2:44 a.m. Friday.

"It's absurd," Massoud told CBC News. "Give me a warning saying ‘you didn't pay attention, be careful.'

"I'm going to contest it, obviously. And it's going to be a waste of time," he added.

In a written statement to CBC News, Montreal's police department quoted an obscure law that's been on the books since 1924.

A spokesman for Quebec's automobile insurance society said the law was put in place at a time when horse-drawn sleighs were still a popular mode of transportation in the province.

It was meant to keep out children and others not qualified to conduct such vehicles, Mario Vaillancourt told CBC News.

It's been awhile since it was enforced, but it does exist, he said.

CBC News contacted police departments in other Canadian provinces and, of those contacted, only British Columbia was found to have a similar law.

However, a spokesman for the Vancouver police department said its officers usually give a warning for not locking your car.

Massoud says that's the logical thing to do, and can't help but wonder why it results in a fine in Montreal.

"You wonder where the money is going, in this city of corruption," he said.