Montreal Mayor wants to honour Robert Bourassa

Seven years after the city was forced to abandon plans to rename Park Avenue, Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre said he wants to rename a street after Robert Bourassa.

Denis Coderre says it’s taken too long for the City to honour the late Quebec Premier

Robert Bourassa, who served two mandates as the Premier of Quebec, died in 1996. (Radio-Canada Archives)

Seven years after the city was forced to abandon plans to rename Park Avenue, Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre said he wants to rename a street after Robert Bourassa.

Speaking during Wednesday’s executive committee meeting, Coderre said it’s taken too long for the City to honour the late Quebec premier.

“I think that for too long we haven't honoured the memory of Robert Bourassa, who was one of our great premiers. We did it for the others — I think it is normal that we honour him too."

In 2007, former Montreal Mayor Gérald Tremblay was forced to back down on plans to rename Park Avenue after public outcry.

Coderre said he will make a proposal in the coming weeks.

“We all know the saga of Park Avenue. I will propose in the coming weeks a street name which I think will not only make consensus, but it is time that we make a decision.”

Coderre on the air

At today’s executive committee meeting, Coderre also confirmed that he will soon have his own television show.

Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre says a 30-minute TV show will be a way to get closer to Montrealers. (Radio-Canada)
He said that starting this fall, the LCN network will air J’ai une question pour vous, M. le Maire (I have a question for you, Mr. Mayor).

The 30-minute show, will have a host and follow a question-and-answer format.

Coderre said he sees the program as an opportunity to get closer to Montrealers.

“I think it is an additional means to have a direct link with citizens,” he said, adding that one of his predecessors, Jean Drapeau, also had his own show.

People will be able to submit questions via social media or video. Coderre will also address current events and news of the day.

Twenty-four episodes are planned, and Coderre said he's also in talks to have an English-language equivalent.

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