Montreal fox sightings cause a stir on social media

Fox sightings in Montreal are causing a commotion on social media as these red canines have been spotted in alleyways, parks and backyards around the city, particularly in NDG.

Foxes are nothing to worry about, says wildlife expert, unless you have one living on your property

Two fox cubs were found living under a concrete porch in Beaconsfield. Foxes have also been spotted in alleyways, parks and backyards around Montreal, particularly in NDG (submitted by Chris Grabas)

Fox sightings in Montreal are causing a commotion on social media as these red canines have been spotted in alleyways, parks and backyards around the city, particularly in NDG.

Chris Grabas, a wildlife expert with Skedaddle Humane Wildlife Control, told CBC Montreal's Homerun that foxes are nothing to worry about — unless you have one living on your property.

"Females can be somewhat dangerous when you get to the spring season when they have their little pups," Grabas said.

"If you have one living somewhere on your property, let's say under a tool shed or under your deck or front porch, and you notice little ones coming out in the spring, you might want to be cautious about getting close to them."

Grabas was not surprised by the increase in fox sightings. He said these secretive animals have always lived on the island, but are more noticeable in the winter as there is less vegetation to cover them.

Foxes also roam around more than usual in the winter.

"They are looking for mates at this time of year, and Valentine's day is around the corner," said Grabas.

To ensure your property is fox free, homeowners should look for a burrowed hole leading underneath a shed or deck, and keep an eye out for animal tracks.

"At this time of the year it'll be a lot easier to notice tracks. If you notice tracks, you'll be able to tell what species you're dealing with," Grabas said.

If you see a fox, or think there is a fox living on your property, Grabas said the best thing to do is call Skedaddle Humane Wildlife Control.

"We will come out there, we will assess the situation, and we will provide you with a solution in order to make them leave and be able to protect that area so they wouldn't be able to get back underneath once they are gone," Grabas said.


To reach Skeddadle Humane Wildlife Control, call 514-395-4555 or visit their website

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