Hydro-Québec clients plan blackout protest against rate hikes

More than 95,000 Hydro-Québec clients have confirmed on Facebook that they will turn off their breakers for one hour in protest of rate hikes.

95,000 say they will turn off their breakers for one hour Wednesday night

Event organizers say that turning off the power for an hour on Wednesday night is a way for clients to tell Hydro-Quebec they do not agree with rising electricity prices.

More than 95,000 Hydro-Québec clients say they will turn off their breakers for an hour, in protest of rate hikes going into effect tomorrow.

"Maybe on 1 January 2016, Hydro will be responsible for a mini baby boom in Quebec instead of the impoverishment of its population!" says the description on the "Grand black-out Hydro-Qc" Facebook page. 

Event organizers say that turning off the power from 7 p.m. until 8 p.m. Wednesday night is a way for clients to tell Hydro-Quebec they do not agree with rising electricity prices.

"People are outraged but don’t necessarily know how to go about it," event organizer Janique Delorme told Mike Finnerty on CBC's Daybreak. 

Maybe... Hydro will be responsible for a mini baby boom in Quebec instead of the impoverishment of its population!- 'Grand black-out Hydro-Qc' Facebook description

"I think that this is creating a movement of solidarity, and that’s the point of all this."

Delorme said this event is part of larger protests against the Quebec government's recent cost-cutting measures. 

"People are fed up with everything. Prices are going up in so many areas with the government, and they're cutting in public services," said Delorme. 

The rate increase, approved by Quebec's Energy Board earlier this month, is less than the 3.9 per cent hike that Hydro-Québec had requested. 

The residential rate increase comes on the heels of Hydro-Québec's record-breaking profits posted in 2014.

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