Hour of Code aims to demystify computer programming in 1 hour

Computer code is something the mystifies — even intimidates — many people. But advocates say that spending just one hour with code can make that angst disappear and reveal a world of possibilities.

Global movement offers tutorials and activities to gently introduce all ages to coding

Computer education advocates say learning code at an early age exposes children to logical thinking and problem-solving skills. (Cathy Yeulet/istock)

Computer code is something the mystifies — even intimidates — many people. But advocates say that spending just one hour with code can make that angst disappear and reveal a world of possibilities.

That's what Hour of Code, a global movement to introduce people to computer programming, is all about. Spend one hour playing with code this week, either through personal workshops, online tutorials or teacher-led lessons.

"In that hour you can discover all sorts of things," said Kate Arthur, co-founder of Kids Code Jeunesse, a Montreal non-profit that offers free training for children.

She would know. Arthur is an English literature major.

"It's not my world, computer science. But the ability to know how to read and write code is part of my literature. It's part of my ability to communicate," she told CBC Montreal's Daybreak.

Scratch is a visual programming language that introduces kids to the logic of computer programs in a fun way. (CBC)

CBC has partnered with the organization to offer two online tutorials that families can use at home.

There will also be activities for families on Saturday at Notman House on 51 Sherbrooke Street West:

  • For kids six and above: create digital season's greeting cards.
  • For kids 10 and above: an introduction to Python, one of the world's most popular programming languages.

The events are free, but registration is required.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.