While most Montrealers say that their city is one to be proud of, roughly half of them say the city is "not as good" as it was compared to five years ago, a CBC-Ekos poll shows.

The poll, which surveyed 853 Montrealers in mid-February, found that 51 per cent of respondents said they agree with the statement “Montreal is not as good as it was five years ago.”

In spite of this, most Montrealers  77 per cent  said they agreed with the statement “Montreal is a city to be proud of.”

A majority — 65 per cent — also answered favourably to the statement “Montreal is a leading city in North America.”

Corruption and local politics

A high number of Montrealers have similar views in terms of perceived corruption.

About seven out of 10 Montreal residents said they agree with the statement, “I think there is a lot of corruption among my local politicians.”

Almost six out of 10 said the quality of the city’s local infrastructure is unacceptable.

Stay or Go public event

CBC Montreal invites you to Stay or Go — a live interactive event — online.

Join CBC News anchor Debra Arbec as she links up with Andy Nulman of Just for Laughs, Natalia Yanchak of "The Dears," author Heather O'Neill and others in a live video chat.

They will explore the internal push and pull of whether to leave the province or stay put.  You can join the conversation and share your stories in a web chat.

It's happening March 13th starting at 6:45 p.m. on cbc.ca/stayorgo

About the survey

A total of 853 Montreal residents were interviewed by phone between Feb. 10 and 18, 2014, as part of this CBC-commissioned Ekos study. The margin of error for a sample of 853 is plus or minus 3.4 percentage points, 19 times out of 20

Those surveyed included 453 anglophones (with a margin of error of plus or minus 4.6 percentage points 95 per cent of the time), 232 francophones (with a margin of error of plus or minus 6.4 percentage points 95 per cent of the time) and 168 allophones (with a margin of error of plus or minus 7.6 percentage points 95 per cent of the time).

Anglophones are respondents who identified their mother tongue as English; francophones are people who identified their mother tongue as French; and allophones identified their mother tongue as "other."