Reginald Sinclair, who played for the NHL and was a 2003 inductee to the McGill ​University Sports Hall of Fame, passed away Thursday, November 14 in Quispamsis, N.B. at the age of 88.

In three National Hockey League seasons with the New York Rangers and Detroit Red Wings from 1950 to 1953, Sinclair scored 49 goals with 43 assists, along with 139 penalty minutes in 208 regular season games.

Reg Sinclair card

Reggie Sinclair played for the New York Rangers from 1950 until 1952.

He also played in two NHL all-star games—1951 and 1952.

Born on March 6, 1925 in Lachine, Que., Sinclair served with the Royal Canadian Air Force from 1943 to 1945.

After the war, he enrolled at McGill, where he was an all-star with the Redmen from 1945 to 1949, and earned a commerce degree in 1949.

During his senior year, Sinclair served as captain of the Redmen and was voted MVP of the Senior Intercollegiate Hockey League after winning the conference scoring title with 21 goals and 14 assists in 12 games.

A prolific scorer, he tied a McGill single-game —recordwhich still standsscoring 10 points, including seven assists, against the University of Montreal Carabins on Feb. 25, 1949.

Sinclair also established a number of other McGill records, including: most assists in a period, most assists in a game, fastest five points and assists in a game, fastest four points and assists in a game, and fastest three points and assists in a game.

He signed as a free-agent with the New York Rangers on Oct. 3, 1950.

Sinclair was the only rookie to make the Rangers roster out of training camp that season, and led all NHL rookies with 39 points, including 18 goals in 70 games.

This accomplishment tied Sinclair for the team point-scoring lead and earned him a berth in the NHL all-star game.

Despite his scoring prowess, the Rangers traded Sinclair to the Detroit Red Wings on Aug. 18, 1952.

With the Red Wings, he posted an 11-12-23 record in 69 games and retired after that season.

When his playing days were done, Sinclair moved to East Riverside, N.B, where he served many years as an executive with Royal Crown Cola. He later moved to Rothesay, N.B.

A memorial service is scheduled for November 22.