Protesters call on Justin Trudeau to save Dorval golf course

After losing a court battle, a group of West Island residents is making a last-ditch plea to the prime minister to save the old Dorval Municipal Golf Course from bulldozers and chainsaws.

Group seeks to protect Dorval Municipal Golf Course from development

Lisa Mintz (right) and other protesters want an end to the cutting of trees at the former Dorval Municipal Golf Course. (Lisa Mintz/Facebook)

After losing a court battle, a group of West Island residents is making a last-ditch plea to the prime minister to save the old Dorval Municipal Golf Course from bulldozers and chainsaws.

The group of about 10 people protested on Wednesday against Aéroports de Montréal, which is cutting trees on the space to make room for a new airport facility. ADM owns the land west of the airport and has been leasing the land to the golf course for the last 20 years.

The airport authority ended the lease last year.

"Everyone uses the land. It's a barrier for sound between the airport and residents. It's a green space and by municipal law it's supposed to stay a green space," Lisa Mintz, the protest organizer, told CBC's Homerun.

Last Friday a judge ruled against an injunction to prevent construction on the land. Crews have since been on the land clearing trees for development.

Now the protesters are asking Prime Minister Justin Trudeau himself to intervene.

The land previously occupied by the Dorval Municipal Golf Course belong to Aéroports de Montréal, which is expanding the airport. (Google Maps)

"We're calling on Trudeau to get involved as his father has done in the past," Mintz said. "We want him to stop the cutting of the trees until an environmental impact study can be done."

The group has been sending emails to Trudeau's office, sending tweets at him, and posting on his Facebook page. So far, they've received no response.

Christiane Beaulieu, a representative of ADM, previously told CBC News that the airport was looking into noise reduction measures and would maintain a "treeline" for residents living on the street behind the airport.

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