CP Rail accidentally bulldozes Mile End's Field of Possibilities

Canadian Pacific Railway says it will remove bulldozers and pay to restore a park after it accidentally tore up land it does not own.

Canadian Pacific Railway doesn't own land and didn't have permission to bulldoze park

CP workers accidentally tore up plants and other vegetation at the park while creating a staging area to construct sections of track. (Jay Turnbull/CBC)

A sliver of greenery that was partially bulldozed by Canadian Pacific Railway by accident will be refurbished on the rail company's dime, according to a spokeswoman.

The city-owned property has been turned into a neighbourhood park and meeting place by local residents. CP says it will restore the park. (Amis du Champ des possibles/Facebook)

The Field of Possibilities sits near the corner of Bernard Street and De Gaspé Avenue in Montreal's Mile End and has long been used as a neighbourhood park by nearby residents.

According to a local citizens group, the city bought the land from CP in 2006. 

The group said the parcels of land are rich in biodiversity, and that residents had been fighting to get the green space protected by the city for years.

Both the city and the Plateau-Mont-Royal borough confirmed to CBC News that CP did not have the right to bulldoze any part of the park.

The workers ripped up plants and grass this week and set up a staging area to build train tracks before moving them.

CP spokeswoman Salem Woodrow said the land was used in error, and that workers will remove bulldozers by the middle of next week and pay to refurbish the park.

"We regret any inconvenience," Woodrow said.

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