Concordia paid out $235k severance to executive who worked 90 days

Concordia University paid out a $235,000 severance package to an executive who worked there for just 90 days, a spokesperson at the university confirmed.

Sonia Trudel hired as chief financial officer in August to help with budget constraints

In 2012, Quebec's education ministry fined Concordia University $2 million for spending too much money on golden parachutes. (CBC)

Concordia University paid out a $235,000 severance package to an executive who worked there for just 90 days, a spokesperson at the university confirmed.

Sonia Trudel was hired as Concordia's chief financial officer on Aug. 17. 

A chartered accountant by trade, Trudel was recruited for her experience working with public institutions facing budget cuts, Concordia said in a press release last year.

Trudel left the university as part of a "mutual agreement," said Chris Mota, a spokesperson for Concordia.

Mota declined to comment on the reasons she left, but said that it "fulfilled its contractual obligations."

The terms of the severance package were obtained by Concordia's student newspaper, The Link, through an access to information request.

Trudel was also given access to benefits like insurance, and a research allowance of $5,000 for 60 days after leaving Concordia.

Concordia has a history of giving out excessive severance packages.

In 2012, Quebec's education ministry fined the university $2 million for spending too much money on golden parachutes.

At the time, Concordia said it has handed out a total of $2.4 million dollars to five senior managers over several years.

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