A former varsity football player who sued Bishop's University in Quebec after suffering a brain hemorrhage during a 2011 game has reached a settlement with the university.

Kevin Kwasny's lawyer's office confirmed an out-of-court settlement was reached Thursday, the day the case was supposed to go to trial.

Had the case proceeded to court, it would have been "one of the largest personal injury lawsuits … involving a Canadian university," one of Kwasny's lawyers, Jamie Kagan, told CBC News in an email.

Lawyer Robert Kugler told CBC the settlement will help Kwasny get the therapy and care he needs.

"Kevin requires a number of different kinds of therapy in order to improve his speech," said Kugler. "In order to improve his co-ordination, in order to improve his memory, in order to improve various aspects of his life."

The details of the settlement are confidential, and the settlement does not include an admission of liability, according to a joint statement from both Kwasny's family and the university.

Forced back into game: lawsuit

Kwasny, who is now 27, filed a lawsuit against the university in Sherbrooke, Que., after he claimed his coaches forced him back into a game despite showing symptoms of a concussion after a blow to the head.

Kwasny, originally from Winnipeg, was in his third season with the Gaiters when he complained of nausea and dizziness during the game in September 2011, according to the lawsuit.

Bishop's University

Kevin Kwasny and Bishop's University have agreed to an out-of-court settlement. (CBC)

Shortly after returning to the field, he was hit again and suffered a major brain bleed. He was taken off the field as he began vomiting and lost consciousness.

He was rushed to hospital, where he was put into a medically induced coma and underwent emergency surgery to relieve pressure on his brain.

None of these claims have been proven in court.

Struggled with basic tasks

Kwasny told CBC News in 2013 that as a result of his injuries, he lost the ability to perform basic tasks, such as tying his shoes or cutting his food.

"I lost my girlfriend. I lost my eyesight. I've lost use of the right side of my body. And I've lost my fact that I could have been in the CFL today had this not have happened to me," Kwasny said at the time.

With files from CBC's Elias Abboud