ASSÉ student group preps for spring anti-austerity protests

Militant student organization ASSÉ is promising a multitude of "disruptive actions" for the coming weeks if the Couillard government pushes forward with its austerity measures.

Members of 2012's Maple Spring movement seek to revive labour and student protests with Printemps 2015

Thousands of Quebec students and their supporters protested throughout the late winter and spring of 2012. (Ryan Remiorz/The Canadian Press)

Militant student organization ASSÉ is promising a multitude of "disruptive actions" for the coming weeks if the Couillard government pushes forward with its austerity measures.

ASSÉ spokeswoman Camille Godbout told The Canadian Press that seeing as protests and petitions have done little to sway the government, protesters will take "other steps."

She accused the government of ransacking public services in the province and destroying decades of social progress.

The student organization is holding a conference this weekend in Montreal to discuss its action plan for the months to come.

ASSÉ has already announced a province-wide protest on April 2 at Square-Victoria in Montreal.

The website for an organization called Printemps 2015 — a reference to the student protests of 2012, which were called "le printemps érable," or Maple Spring — says a number of "disruptive actions" are planned between Feb. 23 to March 27.

The website is also keeping a tally of the student associations at Quebec CEGEPs and universities that have pledged to boycott classes this spring.

The group, of which ASSÉ appears to be a leading member, is also organizing weekly anti-austerity protests beginning March 21.

With additional reporting by CBC News

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