Archeology students dig for 15th-century Iroquois artifacts

Students from the University of Montreal will be spending the month of August in St-Anicet, Que., digging for artifacts left behind by an Iroquois tribe back in the 1400s.

Droulers-Tsiionhiakwatha site in Quebec's Montérégie was pre-colonial home to St. Lawrence Iroquois

Students from the University of Montreal will be spending the month of August in St-Anicet, Que., digging for artifacts left behind by the St. Lawrence Iroquois tribe back in the 1400s.

This archeological exercise is taking place at the Droulers-Tsiionhiakwatha Archeological Site Interpretation Centre, currently located in a spot where hundreds of Iroquois lived in the pre-colonial days.

The site is open to the public and is operated in close collaboration with the Mohawks in Akwesasne, who also belong to the Iroquois First Nation. 

Droulers-Tsiionhiakwatha also features replica longhouses, the typical dwellings used by the St. Lawrence Iroquois. 

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Based on a report by Bruno Coulombe, Radio-Canada

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