Advance voting in Quebec's municipal elections takes place across the province today, ahead of the official polling day next Sunday, November 3. 

Advance polls are open from noon until 8 p.m.

Voters must present valid ID and ensure they are registered on the electoral list.

To find out where to vote, consult the yellow reminder card sent by mail to every household over the past few days.

One of the following pieces of identification must be presented to vote:

  • Medicare card issued by RAMQ 
  • Quebec driver's license  
  • Certificate of Indian Status 
  • Canadian Forces identity card
  • Canadian passport

Some cities also have additional days of advance voting.

In Montreal, one polling station will be open in each electoral district until Wednesday afternoon.

  • Monday, October 28 from 9 a.m. until 9 p.m.
  • Tuesday, October 29 from 9 a.m. until 9 p.m.
  • Wednesday, October 30 from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m.

On Friday, the first day of advance polls in Montreal, some voters at advance polling stations waited as long as two hours to cast their ballots. Waits are not expected to be as long today because many more polling stations will be open.

Advance polling stations accessible to disabled

All board of revisors offices, borough election offices and advance polling stations on Sunday will be accessible to people with reduced mobility. 

That differs from the official polling day on Nov. 3, when some polling stations may not be accessible. Montreal's chief electoral officer is advising people with reduced mobility to the information shown on the reminder mailed out last week, by calling 514 872-VOTE (872-8683) or emaling election@ville.montreal.qc.ca.

Aside from Montreal, seven other municipalities have additional advance voting days. They are Gatineau, Saint-Georges-de-Beauce, Beloeil, Rivière-du-Loup, Montmagny, Sainte-Agathe-des-Monts and Lacolle.

Voting will take place on November 3 from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.

According to the Election Act, employers must give employees a leave of at least four consecutive hours to vote during voting hours, regardless of the time normally allowed for meals.

Voter turnout

The Union of Quebec Municipalities says it hopes at least 50 percent of voters will cast their ballots by the time polls close on the evening of November 3.

In 2009, the participation rate in Quebec's major cities was about 45 per cent.

In Montreal, 39.44 per cent of registered voters came out to the polls in 2009.

Turnout was the highest in Saguenay at 51.7 per cent, where Mayor Jean Tremblay was re-elected with an overwhelming majority of 78 percent of votes cast.