Canada's Immigration and Refugee Board has ordered actor Randy Quaid released from custody after the American actor was arrested in Montreal last week.

randy quaid immigration and refugee board montreal

Actor Randy Quaid appeared before the Immigration and Refugee Board on Tuesday, at the Guy-Favreau Complexe in downtown Montreal. A board member ordered that he be released on a $10,000 bond. (Steve Rukavina/CBC News)

Quaid, 64, is expected to be released later Tuesday. He was arrested May 14, and is being held at a detention centre in Laval, Que.

An arrest warrant was issued for Quaid in January 2013 after he missed an appointment for an IRB interview. 

Barely recognizable behind a bushy beard and long hair, Quaid appeared before the immigration board in Montreal today. 

Quaid and his wife Evi applied for refugee status in 2010, claiming they were being persecuted in the U.S. and were possible targets of so-called "Hollywood star-whackers" who were bent on killing actors.

Evi Quaid's father was born in Canada and she was granted Canadian citizenship in 2012. She, therefore, could have sponsored her husband's immigration application.

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Randy Quaid and his wife Evi fled to Canada in 2010.

He then withdrew his refugee claim and applied for permanent residency status. His immigration application, however, was denied in 2013 because according to Federal Court documents, he had been accused of defrauding an innkeeper in California —  an act that would be considered a Criminal Code offence in Canada.

Until last Thursday, the government had no idea where Quaid had been living after he failed to show up for the 2013 IRB interview. 

As it turned out, the couple has been living in Montreal since February 2013.

Quaid testified during the hearing about why he had missed his scheduled meeting with the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) in January 2013.

He said he was "devastated" after his request for permanent residency status in Canada was denied, so he decided to move to Montreal.

"I'd lost faith in the system. I wanted to get into a space where I could have time to investigate. I needed to gather evidence about what happened in Santa Barbara," Quaid testified, referring to the accusations he's facing in California.

"I meant no disrespect to Canadian border services. I have great respect for them, but I didn't feel that anyone else was willing to listen to me," Quaid continued.

He testified he's now ready co-operate.

"At this point, I desire nothing more than to fully co-operate with any restrictions or conditions, as long as I could be with my wife, even if that means going back to the States to reapply for permanent residency status in Canada," Quaid told the hearing.

Quaid also told the hearing that he and his wife love Montreal and hope to continue living there.

IRB member Dianne Tordorf  presided over the hearing.  

Tordorf explained that Quaid was arrested May 14 after being recognized by a CBSA agent entering a home on Mcgregor Avenue in downtown Montreal.

Tordorf said that CBSA agents then converged on the home and rang the doorbell repeatedly, but there was no answer.

She said the CBSA then called in Montreal police who broke down the door and found Quaid, his wife and a dog. The actor was then arrested without incident.

CBSA confirmed to CBC News that Quaid was arrested with the support of Montreal's police force.

Quaid was ordered released from detention in Montreal after his father-in-law agreed to post a $10,000 bond.

He is still technically under a removal order from Canada, and could be ordered to leave the country at any time. In the meantime, he will be free under certain conditions, which include regularly checking in with CBSA officials.

Quaid is known for movies including Brokeback Mountain and National Lampoon's Vacation, and is the brother of prolific actor Dennis Quaid.