A trio of baby falcons now live at Université de Montréal, and you can watch their every move

Two of the baby birds, called eyasses, started breaking through their egg shells on Monday, a scene bird lovers were able to watch unfold thanks to a livestream.

First time in 3 years that eggs laid at the university have hatched

Mama bird keeps a watchful eye over her baby peregrine falcon as it hatches. Three of four eggs in the nest box atop the Université de Montréal's campus have hatched this year. (Facebook/Faucons de l'UdeM)

For the first time in three years, baby peregrine falcons are figuring out this thing called life from their nest high atop the Université de Montréal campus.

Two of the baby birds, called eyasses, started breaking through their egg shells on Monday, a scene bird lovers were able to watch unfold thanks to a livestream.

By Wednesday morning, there was another baby bird in the nest, bringing the total to three small, fuzzy, white little things chowing down on some raw meat.

If you want to check up on them, click play on the livestream below.

Ève Bélisle, who is responsible for the falcons at the university, first installed a nest box on the 23rd floor of the Roger-Gaudry pavilion tower in 2008. The first babies hatched in 2009.

An amateur ornithologist, Bélisle told Radio-Canada she wanted to help peregrine falcons, which were endangered at the time, reproduce. As of last December, the birds are no longer at risk of extinction.

The mother laid four eggs this year. The eggs laid in 2016 and 2017 didn't hatch.

The birds will be tagged in about a month so their movements can be monitored, an event that may be streamed live on the group's Facebook page.

The birds grow quickly, Belisle said, and by July they should be flying. The parents will teach them to hunt over the summer, and by the fall they will go their separate ways.

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With files from Radio-Canada