More than 100 Manitobans filled a lecture hall at the University of Winnipeg Wednesday afternoon, to examine the idea of Trumpism and the factors that led to president-elect Donald Trump's win in 2016.

The UWinnipeg's Political Science Speakers' Series organized the panel in advance of the inauguration Jan. 20. 

"You could clearly see by the attendance today that there's certainly a thirst and an interest in the events that are occurring down south," said Paul Lawrie, an associate professor in the department of history at the University of Winnipeg.

University Associate Professor Paul Lawrie discussed 'Trumpism' at the U of W today

University Associate Professor Paul Lawrie discussed Trumpism at the U of W today. (CBC News )

Lawrie was one of three faculty members who delved into the topic of Trumpism over the lunch hour. 

"I think that what came out of this panel is that Trumpism is a political movement," said Lawrie. "But, it's a political movement that's quite elastic.... It's generally defined by a populous revolt against the status quo, whether that be on issues of trade, on immigration, or the economy."

Lawrie said curiosity about the Trump presidency on this side of the border stems from the fact that Canada's future is tied to that of the United States in a variety of ways. 

"I think Canadians are concerned or anxious in many ways about the unpredictability of a Trump presidency," said Lawrie. "Not just for Canada, but what does that mean for the world."

Political science student Sofia Vartsakis attended the event.

Political science student Sofia Vartsakis

Political science student Sofia Vartsakis will be watching to see how a Trump presidency impacts Canada. (CBC News)

"Trumpism is going to be something that will definitely go down in history and I mean it will be something to look back at," said Vartsakis. 

She said she'll be watching to see how the international community reacts, but also what affect the next four years will have on Canadians. 

"Living in Canada we really heavily rely on on the states and whatever happens to them really impacts us," said Vartsakis.

Matthew Flisfeder, assistant professor in the department of rhetoric, writing, and communications, was also on the panel.

"In the face of something like Trump and Trumpism, I'm glad to see there are so many people that are interested, that are concerned, that are willing to come to a public discussion of its meanings and implications," said Flisfeder.