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Sports-themed promises part of Manitoba election campaign platforms

The Manitoba election campaign focused partly on sports Tuesday, as promises were made for fans of soccer and curling.

From sports to a safe centre for women, it was a busy day on the campaign trail in Manitoba

PC Leader Brian Pallister, shown here taking a selfie with some young curling fans at Rossmere Curling Club, promised to build an international curling centre of excellence in Winnipeg if his party forms government April 19. (Tyson Koschik/CBC )

The Manitoba election campaign focused partly on sports Tuesday, as promises were made for fans of soccer and curling.

NDP Leader Greg Selinger was in Brandon to promise two new soccer pitches at Assiniboine Community College if he is re-elected April 19.

He also said he would partner with the city to build more fields based on a municipal feasibility study that is underway.

Progressive Conservative Leader Brian Pallister promised to build an international curling centre of excellence in Winnipeg.

He said the aim is to strengthen Manitoba's leadership in the sport and help prepare athletes at all levels, including the Olympics.

Liberal Leader Rana Bokhari reiterated an earlier promise to give municipalities one percentage point of the provincial sales tax for infrastructure projects of their choosing.

"We feel an open and transparent fund that distributes money directly to municipal governments will give those local governments the power to make the choices that best fit their needs," Bokhari said.

The parties also made promises in other areas.

The New Democrats also promised to create a 24-hour centre for vulnerable women in downtown Winnipeg.

Candidate Nahanni Fontaine says the party would work with community agencies to create the centre, and funding would come from $1 million the party has already promised to address violence against women.

The Tories promised to add 1,200 new personal care home beds over eight years, to address a backlog that they say currently leaves people waiting for up to six months.

"Seniors and their families are paying the price of this broken NDP promise with greater stress and anxiety about the care and comfort of their loved ones," Pallister said in a Tory news release.