A social worker who was assigned to Phoenix Sinclair's case will continue testifying today at a public inquiry into the Manitoba girl's death.

Kerry-Lynn Greeley began her testimony Wednesday afternoon at the inquiry, which is looking at the circumstances surrounding the death in 2005 of five-year-old Phoenix.

Greeley was involved in the first months after Phoenix was apprehended from her biological mother, Samantha Kematch, within days of her birth in April 2000.

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An undated photograph of Phoenix Sinclair that was submitted in September at a public inquiry looking into the girl's death. Hearings continue on Thursday. (Phoenix Sinclair Inquiry)

The inquiry was established to look at how Phoenix could have slipped through the cracks of Manitoba's child and family services (CFS) system during her short life, as well as why her death went undiscovered for months.

The little girl had been taken into custody by CFS officials at least twice in her life — once at birth and again three years later — but she was returned to Kematch each time.

Phoenix was neglected, confined and repeatedly abused by Kematch and Karl McKay, the girl's stepfather, at their home on the Fisher River First Nation.

While Phoenix was killed in June 2005, it was not until nine months later that her body was found, wrapped in plastic, in an unmarked shallow grave near the local landfill.

Both Kematch and McKay were convicted in 2008 of first-degree murder in her death.

On Wednesday, Greeley testified about the importance of note-taking in assessing children in care.

Earlier in the day, the inquiry heard that Andrew Orobko, one of the supervising social workers when Phoenix was first apprehended by CFS workers, had destroyed all of his notes from that period in 2010, even though an inquiry into her death was going to be held.

Orobko testified on Wednesday that the notes were strictly about personnel matters and were not at all related to the matters being discussed at the inquiry.

The Phoenix Sinclair inquiry began Sept. 5 and resumed hearings on Wednesday following a two-month hiatus.