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'We got nothing to complain about': Jets coach responds to Sharks' slam

The head coach of the Winnipeg Jets says NHL players have little to complain about after a house-made video released by the San Jose Sharks poked fun at The Peg before Sunday's game.

Mayor Brian Bowman, Premier Brian Pallister also respond to sassy San Jose Sharks video

Winnipeg Jets head coach Paul Maurice says no one involved with the NHL has anything to complain about when it comes to the cities where teams play. (Jeff Stapleton/CBC)

The head coach of the Winnipeg Jets says NHL players have little to complain about after an in-house video released by the San Jose Sharks poked fun at The Peg before Sunday's game.

Paul Maurice shook his head in bewilderment Tuesday when asked what he thought of the video, before responding he hadn't actually watched it.

"I heard [the players said] 'it's cold and dark.' Well, that happens in Canada, occasionally. Regularly, every winter. It's dark at night, yep, that happens around the world."

The Sharks released the video on Twitter a few hours before Sunday's game, in which the Jets trounced the San Jose team 4-1. The tweet has since been deleted.

In the video, Sharks sniper Tomas Hertl said he doesn't like the city because "it's so cold and dark there." Defenceman Justin Braun echoed those remarks, adding that the hotel the team stays at is "questionable" and wondering if Winnipeg has Wi-Fi yet.

Tim Heed, another defenceman, also ranked Winnipeg at the bottom of the heap.

The thread count in your hotel isn't right or your frappuccino isn't frothed right … my point being, we got nothing to complain about. Pretty good life. Every day. Every city is a pretty darn good one.- Winnipeg Jets head coach Paul Maurice

While the video was meant to be tongue-in-cheek, some local leaders responded on Monday, and Winnipeg Mayor Brian Bowman and Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister also waded in on Tuesday.

Pallister jokingly told media he would welcome the Sharks players back and tell them to prepare for another defeat, and Bowman gave instructions for the players on how to connect their devices to the internet.

"I certainly took note of the fact that some were lamenting Winnipeg as a cold, dark place. I know it is a cold, dark place when you lose," said Bowman. 

"I certainly wanted to clarify for some of the Sharks players for Wi-Fi. There's a simple setting — if you have an iPhone, you go to the Wi-Fi and you hit 'on,'" he said, demonstrating on his phone. "I would suggest they learn about those settings."

Musician Bif Naked, who spent her formative years in and around Winnipeg, said Winnipeggers are used to trash talk but also called the comments unfair. 

She boasted of the city's tough winters: "It puts hair on your chest."

"Certainly it's cold but it makes us tough and we love it," she said. 

But it was Maurice who had the final say.

"I don't think any coach, any player, trainer, referee, should ever complain about a day in the National Hockey League," he told media Tuesday afternoon.

"The thread count in your hotel isn't right or your frappuccino isn't frothed right — I don't even know what a frappuccino is — but my point being, we got nothing to complain about. Pretty good life. Every day. Every city is a pretty darn good one."

The Winnipeg Jets are currently first in the NHL's Central Division.

About the Author

Elisha Dacey

Journalist

Elisha Dacey is a journalist with CBC Manitoba. She is the former managing editor of Metro Winnipeg and her work has been seen in newspapers from coast to coast. Reach her at elisha.dacey@cbc.ca.

With files from the Canadian Press