Neepawa man trying to reach family after Philippines storm

A week after Typhoon Haiyan slammed into central Philippines, a Neepawa man says he is still trying to contact his wife and two children in his home country.

Typhoon Haiyan destroyed Kent Canasta's home community near Tacloban

A week after Typhoon Haiyan slammed into central Philippines, a Neepawa man says he is still trying to contact his wife and two children in his home country. 1:32

A week after Typhoon Haiyan slammed into central Philippines, a Neepawa man says he is still trying to contact his wife and two children in his home country.

Kent Canasta says his wife, Latecia, his 10-year-old son Kenneth and 16-year-old daughter Sheila Mae have been unreachable since the typhoon struck on Nov. 8.

"It's very painful to me. It's been hard because [it's] supposed to be I am with them because I am the father…. I'm here, I'm working for them," he told CBC News on Friday.

Canasta is among the more than 600 Filipino workers at a pork processing plant in Neepawa, located in southwestern Manitoba.

HyLife Foods has donated $20,000 to Philippine typhoon relief agencies.

Canasta says his wife, Latecia, their 10-year-old son Kenneth and 16-year-old daughter Sheila Mae have been unreachable since the typhoon struck on Nov. 8. (Submitted by Kent Canasta)
Canasta said the last time he spoke with his family was two weeks ago.

A friend in Manila texted him on Thursday night to say his home community near Tacloban has been flattened by the storm but there were no casualties.

But Canasta said he still fears for his family's safety in light of recent reports of rebels attacking buses and intercepting aid convoys.

"My biggest fear right now is the rebels might enter the house and harm them," he said.

While Canasta said he's not sure when he'll get to speak with his family, he knows what he'll tell them when he can.

"Oh, I love them very much, I miss them so much," he said. "Maybe [in] just a couple of months, I'll be home."

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