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Manitoba sends ambulances to Ukraine to help victims of crisis

The province is sending ambulances to Ukraine to serve civilians embroiled in the conflicts in the region.

Ambulances for Ukraine project calls on international community to donate EMS vehicles

The donation is part of Ambulances for Ukraine, a humanitarian project aimed at helping those affected by ongoing violence and civil unrest in the country. 1:00

Manitoba is sending ambulances to Ukraine to serve civilians embroiled in regional conflicts.

Three emergency medical service vehicles headed overseas were unveiled by Manitoba Premier Greg Selinger at a news conference outside the legislative building Monday.

"Manitobans have a special bond with the people of Ukraine, and we stand with them during this crisis and in their time of need," Selinger said in a statement.
Manitoba Premier Greg Selinger speaks to a crowd Monday morning. The province announced it is donating a number of ambulances to the Ukraine. (Trevor Brine/CBC)

The donation is part of Ambulances for Ukraine, a humanitarian project aimed at helping those affected by ongoing violence and civil unrest in the country.

"The ambulance project is a practical way Canadians, and in particular, the Ukrainian Canadian community, can help," Selinger said.

John Holuk, the project manager with Ambulances for Ukraine, said the move to send emergency medical vehicles to the area followed calls on the international community to provide care for victims of violence in eastern Ukraine.
The Manitoba government is donating a number of ambulances to the Ukraine. (Trevor Brine/CBC)

"The second phase will expand the focus to meet the needs highlighted by the United Nations and World Health Organization, where the continuing conflict has deprived many communities [of] access to basic medical care," Holuk, who is also a member of the Ukrainian Canadian Congress Ukraine Appeal, said in a statement.

Saskatchewan and Alberta have already donated ambulances.

Selinger said both provinces previously sent ambulances that have been used for more than 100 emergency trips.

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