Manitoba RCMP see rise in number of fatal crashes in 2015

The number of fatal collisions on Manitoba roads spiked in 2015, RCMP say.

In 40 per cent of the crashes, impairment by drugs or alcohol contributed to the collision, RCMP say

The crash that killed Brandi Manningway, 27, in November was only one of 70 fatal collisions in Manitoba in 2015. (CBC)

The number of fatal collisions on Manitoba roads spiked in 2015, RCMP say.

During the year, 79 people died in a total of 70 fatal collisions — five more deaths than in 2014, when 74 people were killed in 69 fatal collisions.

"This past year, our officers have come upon too many tragedies and deaths, caused by the actions of drivers that chose to drive recklessly or impaired," Said Sgt. Bert Paquet of Manitoba RCMP.

In 40 per cent of crashes that happened in 2015, impairment by drugs or alcohol contributed to the collision, RCMP say.

"It is a continuing tragedy that so many Manitobans lose their lives on our roadways every year and that in so many cases these collisions are preventable," Paquet said. 

"We ask that all Manitobans help us make our roads safer: Take some extra time to get to your destination, be sober and alert, slow down, put away your cell phone and to buckle-up when driving. Do it for you and for the ones you love."

Out of 70 crashes in 2015, 63 happened on the road, seven took place off-road, six involved pedestrians or cyclists and five involved motorcycles.

About half of the crashes — 32 in total — happened in eastern Manitoba, RCMP say. Thirty took place in the western part of the province and eight crashes happened in northern Manitoba.

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