A 20-year-old man who died in an all-terrain vehicle crash in Notre-Dame-de-Lourdes, Man., over the weekend was not wearing a helmet, according to RCMP.

The crash happened Saturday shortly before 6:30 p.m., during an ATV derby that was being held in the southern Manitoba village.

The incident happened on a short section of municipal road, as some of the drivers were preparing to get on a trail, Notre Dame Mayor Denis Bibault told CBC News.

Bibault said he did not see the crash itself, but he and a friend saw a man lying on the road when they arrived at the scene.

"The only thing I saw was a person was stretched out on the side of the road and he appeared to at least be knocked out," he said Sunday.

"We were the first there to arrive, apart from the fact that, I think, the brother of that victim was kneeling over him, trying to help."

'Very terrible thing'

Bibault said he and his friend quickly realized there was little they could do beyond calling for help.

"This is a very terrible thing. You can't help out…. You arrive on a scene and you've got … possibly somebody with a broken neck who's already passed away," Bibault said.

"You've got his brother leaning over him and you can't help him. I mean, he's facing the music. His brother's just been killed."

RCMP say a group of three males were riding on a gravel road when one of them drove around a corner, out of view of the other two riders.

By the time the two riders caught up with the lead rider, he had been thrown off his quad. Emergency crews pronounced him dead at the scene.

Bibault said he believes the young man who died was from Carberry in western Manitoba. Police confirmed the man was from the Rural Municipality of North Cypress, which includes the town of Carberry.

Notre-Dame-de-Lourdes is about 130 kilometres by road southwest of Winnipeg and about 100 kilometres southeast of Carberry.

RCMP say the deceased rider was not wearing a helmet.

Alcohol is being considered as a contributing factor in the crash, police added.

Bibault said he was riding on a two-seat ATV called a side-by-side, which has seatbelts. The 20-year-old driver was riding a single-person quad with no seatbelts, he said.

Upwards of 900 machines were at Saturday's event, which the mayor said is one of the few ATV derbies remaining in Manitoba.

Bibault said he has suggested to derby organizers that they post more caution signs along the course, just to make it as safe as possible.