Most Canadian heist? Goalie swipes cases of brew from beer store

RCMP in Manitoba have posted a YouTube video of two men, one of whom is dressed in beer-league goalie equipment, who smashed their way into a vendor and made off with cases of brewskies.
It would be a scene from a clichéd Canadian movie — if it wasn't so bizarrely real. 0:42

It would be a scene from a clichéd Canadian movie — if it wasn't so bizarrely real.

RCMP in Manitoba have posted a YouTube video of two men, one of whom is dressed in beer-league goalie equipment, who smashed their way into a vendor and made off with cases of brewskies.

Under the glare of streetlight, the netminder runs off with a case in each hand and a goalstick under his arm.

The goalie bandit gets set to climb through a shattered window at a beer store. (YouTube)

It happened Aug. 15, just after 3:30 a.m. in the community of Russell. Video surveillance shows the two thieves climbing through the shattered glass, digging through the coolers, then lumbering away.

One of the men was wearing mitts or gloves, a large coat, ball cap and had his face covered.

The second man had a medium build and was wearing snowpants, a blocker, trapper and carrying a goalie stick.

While the RCMP are serious about catching the thieves, they didn't hesitate to have fun with their news release, noting the man dressed for guarding the crease might not have been an actual goalie.

A man dressed in goalie gear runs away from a beer vendor in Russell, Man. (YouTube)

"He may have been a defenceman or forward in disguise as he was wearing jersey #17 — a non-traditional number for goalies," the release states.

It goes on to say "anyone with information about this theft or has played against a goalie matching this description is asked to call Russell RCMP."

Oh, and the title of the RCMP's YouTube video of the crime? "#17 in your program but #1 on the Russell Manitoba RCMP wanted list."

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