Endangered lizards get extra protection in Manitoba park

A Brandon University professor has convinced the Canadian Herpetological Society to make the provincial park that is home to the prairie skink an “Important Amphibian and Reptile Area.”

Spruce Woods Provincial Park now an Important Amphibian and Reptile Area to help skinks

Juvenile skinks have blue tails that fade to brown when they get older. The northern prairie skink is mainly found in Manitoba's Spruce Woods Provincial Park. (Brandon University)

Manitoba’s only lizard, the northern prairie skink, is getting some extra protection.

A Brandon University professor has convinced the Canadian Herpetological Society to make the provincial park it lives in an “Important Amphibian and Reptile Area.”

Spruce Woods Provincial Park is now the second place in Manitoba to get the protected distinction – the first was the snake pits in Narcisse, Man.

Spruce Woods park is the only place the endangered reptile has been found in Canada.

Skinks are mainly brown with a bright blue tail that fades as they grow older. They usually grow about as long as a human hand.