Crosswalk cameras proposed by Winnipeg councillor

A Winnipeg city councillor says he'd like to see cameras installed at crosswalks in order to catch motorists who don't stop for pedestrians.

Ross Eadie wants to deter motorists from driving through pedestrian crossings

Winnipeg Coun. Ross Eadie says he'd like to see cameras installed at crosswalks in order to catch motorists who don't stop for pedestrians. 1:21

A Winnipeg city councillor says he'd like to see cameras installed at crosswalks in order to catch motorists who don't stop for pedestrians.

Coun. Ross Eadie says he's been receiving a growing number of calls from people saying drivers are not stopping at pedestrian corridors when they should be.

So the Mynarski councillor is floating the idea of having crosswalk cameras in place, similar to cameras that nab vehicles driving through red lights.

Having such cameras at pedestrian corridors could serve as a stronger deterrent for drivers tempted to motor through the flashing lights, Eadie said.

"We know with the red light cameras that some people call it a cash grab. I say no, it's enforcement methodology," he told CBC News late Tuesday.

Eadie said he will ask the Winnipeg Police Board on Friday to investigate the possibility of having crosswalk cameras.

He said he doesn't know yet if the camera technology would work in this type of situation, but he's working on finding out.

Some pedestrians said they think cameras could help prevent some close calls at crossings.

"It might deter some people, not everyone. Some people are just willing to pay the fine and continue with it," said Dayna Kelly.

"But I think for the most part, if I was driving, that would make me want to stop more."

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