Chinese sculptors relieved Great Ice Show will open on time

Organizers of Winnipeg's Great Ice Show say they are happy to be opening on time after mild temperatures meant some extra work for the artists.

Mild temperatures earlier this winter posed challenges for the artists, who used ice brought in on trucks

Organizers of the Great Ice Show in Winnipeg say they've created a crystal city that they hope will attract tourists from around the world. (CBC)

Organizers of Winnipeg's Great Ice Show say they are happy to be opening on time after mild temperatures earlier this winter meant some extra work for the artists.

The show is scheduled to open on Monday and among the features are a 12-metre frozen legislature building, an ice slide that peaks at 40 feet in the air and several toboggan runs.

The finishing touches are being put on ice sculptures at the Great Ice Show taking place at The Forks in Winnipeg, and organizers say they are happy the show will open on time. (CBC)

Warming huts and an ice bar are also part of the family fun at the Great Ice Show at The Forks, which organizers say they hope will draw tourists from around the world.

"You're going to feel proud and … people are going to come to here because we have a winter, not going away … 'Oh, Winnipeg. That's too bad. I don't want to go there during winter time.' This is a brand new experience … locally and internationally " said Andy Zhao, one of the organizers.

"One day we're going to become the winter destination for North America."

For the ice show, dozens of Chinese sculptors — 40 in total — carved more than 1,000 blocks of ice into buildings and monuments that make up a crystal city.

"Of course, come the weekend … we'll have other programs such as clowns, fireworks, magicians and we also have a frozen princess who's going to be here as well to celebrate the winter with us together," Zhao said.

Among the show's features are a selection of carvings, a 12-metre frozen legislature building, an ice slide that peaks at 40 feet in the air and several toboggan runs. (CBC)

Some of the ice in the sculptures was man-made and brought in on trucks because the Red and Assiniboine rivers didn't have ice that was thick enough for the artists to carve.

Tickets for the great ice show are $25 each.

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