Brian Sinclair inquest into ER death resumes in Winnipeg

Doctors and nurses who were on duty five years ago as double amputee Brian Sinclair was waiting 34 hours in a Winnipeg hospital's emergency room will testify today at the inquest for the 45-year-old aboriginal man who died in his wheelchair.

Double amputee waited 34 hours in hospital without receiving care

Brian Sinclair, 45, was found dead in his wheelchair in the emergency waiting room of the Health Sciences Centre in Winnipeg in September 2008 after a wait of a day and 10 hours to receive care. (Family photo)

Doctors and nurses who were on duty five years ago as double amputee Brian Sinclair was waiting 34 hours in a Winnipeg hospital's emergency room will testify today at the inquest for the 45-year-old aboriginal man who died in his wheelchair. 

The first round of the inquest was held in August. The hearings were in recess for over a month, but resume Monday morning and are expected to run through October.

Sinclair died after not being triaged and receiving no treatment in the Health Sciences Centre's ER unit in September 2008.

Surveillance video footage shows Brian Sinclair in the Winnipeg Health Sciences Centre's emergency waiting room. The 45-year-old died in his wheelchair during a 34-hour wait for care. (CBC)

His death was later attributed to a treatable bladder infection.

Manitoba's chief medical examiner, Dr. Thambirajah Balachandra, has said Sinclair would have lived if his blocked catheter had been changed and his infection treated.

Members of the public and patients who were in the emergency waiting room during Sinclair's 34 hours there are also expected to testify..

The witnesses will include a woman who insisted that a security guard check on Sinclair. By the time the guard went over to him, he had already died.

In August, the inquest saw hospital surveillance video footage that showed staff members passing by Sinclair as he sat in his wheelchair.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.