The popular Forks river trail has fallen victim to warming temperatures.

The 6.5-kilometre skating and walking trails are now closed for the season, after a run of eight weeks and four days.

But just as things are warming up, we bring you some cool — and some odd — facts from the 2014 season of the river trail.

  • Average temperature during the trail season: –20 C
  • Size of pants used for Etienne Gaboury’s voyageur warming hut: 216-inch waist, 168-inch inseam
  • Number of shovels broken: 12
  • Yards of snow shovelled: 1 million
  • Hockey pucks recovered from berms around the rinks: 125
  • Marriage proposals on the trail: 3
  • Number of pool noodles used for the Nuzzles warming hut: 2,600
  • Number of pool noodle sword fights on the trail: 2,600
  • Number of Christmas trees used to line the trail: 200
  • Number of NHL practices held: 1

The trail opened Jan. 10 from the Forks to the Osborne bridge, along the Assiniboine River. The the second leg, from the Forks to Churchill Park, along the Red River, opened a week later.

“This was one of the most difficult and challenging years for maintaining a trail,” Paul Jordan, chief operating officer for The Forks, stated in a news release.

“It took a long time to freeze because of the fast moving current, heavy snow created slush pockets and caused large cracks in the ice and the brutal temperatures made it hard to make ice and maintain equipment.” 

During the 2014 season, the trail played host to a number of special events, including a Winnipeg Jets outdoor practice, a curling bonspiel, an ice bike race and was even used as a runway for a fashion show.

The trail also featured 17 unique warming huts and the RAW:almond pop-up restaurant.

The announcement about it being closed for the season was posted on the Forks website Tuesday morning, a day after temperatures reached 6 C.

“We’d really like to emphasize that we won’t be out there testing, maintaining or grooming The Red River Mutual Trail,” Jordan said. “So, if you decide to use it, it will be at your own risk.”