University men's hockey cup to be renamed after David Johnston

The university men's hockey cup will be renamed after former governor general David Johnston.

Former governor general 'humbled' to have cup named after him

David Johnston takes part in a hockey practice with charitable organization H.E.R.O.S. while on a visit in Vancouver in February 2012 during his time as governor general. It was announced Tuesday the university men's hockey cup will be renamed for Johnston. (Andy Clark/Reuters)

The cup university men's hockey teams play for each year will be renamed for former governor general David Johnston.

The announcement was made Tuesday by U Sports, the national brand for university sports in Canada.

The David Johnston University Cup was unveiled at an event Tuesday.

U Sports said on its website the trophy is being renamed to recognize Johnston's support of Canadian university sport and student athletes. Johnston served as president of the University of Waterloo from 1999 to 2010.

Johnston captained the Harvard hockey team in the 1960s. (Google Images)

'Humbled' by honour

Johnston himself grew up playing hockey in Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., and also played at Harvard University in the 1960s and was named to the All American Hockey Team in 1962 and 1963.

Johnston said he was "humbled" to have the cup named after him.

"I love hockey, I love sports and I love the association of the office of the governor general with sports and physical activity and in particular hockey," he said.

"If you're involved in a team sport where there is dependence on one another, you realize that leadership is recognizing the total dependence of the people around you."

The David Johnston University Cup will be handed out for the first time this weekend during the U Sports Cavendish Farms University Cup being held at the University of New Brunswick in Fredericton.

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