Digital devices driving families to distraction: Tenille Bonoguore

While they help families stay in touch and deliver a world of information to our fingertips, smartphones also make it hard for kids to avoid online peer pressure and can distract from the real world around us.

Marcel O'Gorman created a fun DIY project that can help smartphone owners resist temptation

Are digital devices driving your family mad? A playful Waterloo region invention might be just what your tech-saturated family needs this March Break. (iStockphoto)

Digital devices are driving many families to distraction. 

While they help families stay in touch and deliver a world of information to our fingertips, they also make it hard for kids to avoid online peer pressure and can distract from the real world around us. 

That, and the devices' irresistible nature, is why Marcel O'Gorman, director of the University of Waterloo's Critical Media Lab, created a fun DIY project — perfect for families over March Break  — that can help smartphone owners resist the temptation to tap, tune in and tweet.
The Resistor Case is an easy do-it-yourself project to create a material pouch for your phone. Inside the envelope: recycled fabric, metal rivets, nails and velcro. You supply the hammer, the phone and the decorations. (Submitted by: Resistor Case)

It's called the Resistor Case. CBC Kitchener-Waterloo's parenting columnist Tenille Bonoguore explains how and why it works, in the audio below.

CBC Kitchener-Waterloo is holding a draw to give away one Resistor Case DIY kit. 

To enter, call our talkback line at 519-581-0636 and tell us the digital habit you'd most like to break. The contest closes at 11:59 p.m. Wednesday, March 14. 

Parenting columnist Tenille Bonoguore says digital devices are driving many families to distraction. She offers tips on how to put the tech down and reconnect as a family, including using a Resistor Case developed by University of Waterloo professor Marcel O'Gorman. 7:25
 

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