Hamilton police have confirmed that they are dealing with only a single set of human remains at the Waterloo region farm of Dellen Millard.

Millard, 27, was charged with first-degree murder after Tim Bosma, an Ancaster, Ont., man, went missing earlier this month after going on a test drive with men who said they wanted to buy his truck.

Police located Bosma's remains and said they were "burned beyond recognition."

In the last few days, police sources had told CBC News they believed they had found other remains on the property, but they were unsure if they were animal or human.

On Tuesday, Hamilton police Sgt. Matt Kavanagh said, "We're dealing with one set of human remains."

One Hamilton police car was spotted by CBC News on the property near North Dumfries on Tuesday morning, and two green military-style tents set up by police remained standing.

A small memorial to Bosma near the gated entrance to Millard's farm continues to grow, with new bouquets of flowers being added.

Earlier, police found an incinerator on the farm that they say Millard purchased last July. The machine, known as "The Eliminator," is used to cremate livestock, but police said Millard didn't own any animals.

Millard, the heir to a family aviation dynasty, was charged with kidnapping and killing Bosma after the husband and father disappeared while on a test drive May 6 of his truck. He was with two men who answered an online ad for the truck. 

Police said earlier they were searching for other suspects.

Missing persons cases under scrutiny

Investigators said they're examining missing persons cases for potential connections with Millard. At the top of their list is 23-year-old Laura Babcock, who disappeared last summer and, according to friends of the woman, was once in a relationship with Millard.

At the time of Babcock's disappearance, police didn't consider it suspicious.

Babcock's cellphone records show that shortly before she vanished, she had called Millard eight times.

CBC News contacted an ex-boyfriend of Babcock's, Shawn Lerner, who said he examined her phone bill for clues after she went missing and noticed several calls to Millard.

Lerner said Babcock had known Millard "for several years."

Millard's lawyer, Deepak Paradkar, said police have not questioned his client about Babcock's disappearance, and that Millard maintains his innocence in the Bosma case.

Police confirmed they are also investigating the apparent suicide of Millard's father last December.