World-first dementia prevention trial looking for participants in K-W

The SYNERGIC Trial uses a triple-intervention method, which means a combination of exercise, cognition tests and vitamin D will be used to see if the three used together get better results than independently.

Test looks at whether exercise, cognition tests and vitamin D combine for greater benefits

Participants in the SYNERGIC Trial commit to three weekly sessions for five months, and the ideal candidate is an older adult who are showing very early stages of cognitive decline. (Nathan Denette/Canadian Press)

A new approach to dementia prevention is looking for people to take part in trials happening in Waterloo region. 

The SYNERGIC trial uses a triple-intervention method, which means a combination of exercise, cognition tests and vitamin D will be used to see if the three used together get better results than independently, said Laura Middleton, the local researcher for the University of Waterloo-based study.

"We know each of those individually may have beneficial effects, but we don't know whether if these effects can add to a greater effect together or not," Middleton told The Morning Edition host Craig Norris on Tuesday.

Four other locations are also undertaking the study, including Wilfrid Laurier University and Parkwood Hospital in London.

Participants commit to three weekly sessions for five months, and the ideal candidate is an older adult who are showing very early stages of cognitive decline.

For more on the SYNERGIC study, click on the audio below. People interested in participating should contact Kayla Regan at kregan@uwaterloo.ca

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