Teen had drugs and alcohol in system during deadly crash, police say

Stoney Creek teen Shawn Bell was impaired by drugs and alcohol, wasn't wearing his seat belt and was speeding in a deadly crash that killed Bell and a Binbrook father of three back in July.
A group of teens erect a cross where a 17 year-old Stoney Creek teen and a 42 year-old Binbrook man were killed in a head-on collision in July. (Adam Carter/CBC)

Stoney Creek teen Shawn Bell was impaired by drugs and alcohol, wasn't wearing his seat belt and was speeding in the deadly crash that killed Bell and a Binbrook father of three back in July, police confirmed Monday.

On July 26, Bell, 17, was driving a Mazda northbound on Highway 56 in rural Hamilton when he collided head-on with a GMC Terrain SUV driven by Steve Last, 42.

“Investigation has confirmed that the northbound Mazda Protege crossed over the centre line and struck the southbound GMC Terrain,” Hamilton police wrote in a statement.

Bell was pronounced dead at the scene, while Last was taken to hospital and died there of his injuries. His 10-year-old daughter and his 15-year-old daughter were in the SUV with a 15-year-old family friend. They all survived.

Friends said Bell had 'quite a bit to drink'

Friends say Bell had been hanging out with a small group of friends that night and had "quite a bit to drink."

"We were the last people he talked to," Bell's friend Conner Lahie told CBC News the day after the crash. "He gave my friend a hug … and goes 'Nothing's going to happen, I promise.' And then he left."

"We told him it wasn't a good idea — said you're too intoxicated you should stay. He said 'No, I'm leaving.'"

Last was divorced and had two daughters with his ex-wife, said Rob DeVincentis, owner of Baycon Construction, where Last had worked for four years. This year, his new partner gave birth to their first child together.

"He was planning to get remarried," DeVincentis said. "She's a super, super girl. I was with him when he met her."

DeVincentis described Last as a "very soft spoken," a "really down-to-earth guy" would "spend any minute he could take off" with his children.

"I know it's a cliché to say this when somebody's died, but he really was a gentleman."

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