Public will get input in Aerotropolis lands

The public will get a chance to give input early next year on which lands are included in a massive urban boundary expansion around the Hamilton airport.
The Aerotropolis plan impacts 555 hectares around the Hamilton airport, but which 555 hectares will be determined next year. (Mark Chambers/CBC)

The public will get a chance to give input early next year on which lands are included in a massive urban boundary expansion around the Hamilton airport.

In February, the public can make presentations and write letters regarding which 555 net hectares will be included in the Airport Employment Growth District (AEGD), a large area earmarked for industrial and commercial growth by 2031.

The city won an Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) challenge in July after Environment Hamilton and Hamiltonians for Progressive Development (HPD) fought against the plan, which is also known as the Aerotropolis. HPD attempted to appeal the plan but were denied on Nov. 7.

In phase three, the OMB will modify the plan to include 555 hectares around the John C. Munro Hamilton International Airport, a staff report says. The city, and other interested parties, can all give their input.

HPD will discuss the issue Wednesday and decide whether to participate in the process, said co-chair Michael Desnoyers. 

"I highly suspect, given the city's actions so far, that we'll be a part of it," he said.

Timeline:

Jan. 10 — Staff will present a report to the city planning committee on how it feels about the lands chosen by the OMB

Jan. 15 — The staff recommendation will become available to the public, and the planning committee will vote on the issue. The clerk’s office will also take written input from the public until Jan. 31.

Feb. 18 — Member of the public can appear before the planning committee as delegations. Councillors will also consider written comments. Legal staff will also give input.

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