McMaster doctor says think twice before grabbing a sports drink post-workout

If your kids crave a Gatorade after every hockey game, think twice about handing one over, says Dr. David Price, head of family medicine at McMaster University.
If your kids crave a Gatorade after ever hockey game, think twice about handing one over, says Dr. David Price, head of family medicine at McMaster University. (Liam Richards/Canadian Press)

With hockey and other sports seasons ramping up, how do you keep your kids hydrated?

If you tend to hand over a sugary sports-drink because Jimmy wants to shoot a puck like Sidney Crosby, think again, said Dr. David Price, head of family medicine at McMaster University.

Professional athletes like LeBron James can inspire kids and teens to pursue sports and maintain a healthy lifestyle. But according to a recent study in Pediatrics, released Oct. 8, the majority of food and drinks that pro athletes are endorsing are high in calories and unhealthy.

And while some young athletes might be tempted to turn to the sports drinks they see the pros drinking, they may not be the best option.

Listen to our conversation with Dr. Price.

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