Hamilton's 1st baby of 2014 born a minute after midnight

Hamilton's first baby of 2014 couldn't wait to see what the new year has to offer, as she popped out into the world a mere 60 seconds after the clock struck midnight.

A pair of twins born 80 minutes later at McMaster University Medical Centre

Baby girl Elena Isabelle Dariawesh was born at 12:01 a.m Wednesday morning to Marianna and Rani Dariawesh at St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, making her the first baby of 2014 in Hamilton. (Sunnie Huang/CBC)

Hamilton's first baby of 2014 couldn't wait to see what the new year has to offer, as she popped out into the world a mere 60 seconds after the clock struck midnight.

Baby girl Elena Isabelle Dariawesh was born at 12:01 a.m. Wednesday morning at the downtown Charlton Campus of St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton​, weighing six pounds 11 ounces.

Elena's mom Marianna Dariawesh said her first child was scheduled to be born on Jan. 13, and the New Year's Day birth caught her by surprise.

"I always see it on TV. I never thought it would happen to me," she told CBC Hamilton.

The bundle of joy, wrapped from head to toe with a pink polka dot blanket, has received non-stop visits from friends and family since her birth.

Davey King, left, and his twin sister Josie are seen in caps knitted by the hospital's volunteers. (Sunnie Huang/CBC)

"People are missing their parties to be with us," Elena's mom said.

An hour and twenty minutes after Elena's arrival, staff at McMaster University Medical Centre celebrated the hospital's first birth of 2014 — with the arrival of a pair of twins.

Davey and Josie King were born to Sarah and Jesse King from Burlington. Baby boy Davey arrived first at 1:21 a.m, weighing six pounds 8 ounces. About half an hour later, his sister Josie was born. She weighed six pound 10 ounces.

High school sweethearts Sarah and Jesse have been married for 13 years. The twins's arrival makes their first daughter, 2½-year-old Layla, a proud older sister.

Davey and Josie were born after more than 12 hours of labour. Giving birth to Layla — who weighed more than eight pounds when she was born — was no easy task, Sarah said, but delivering twins required a whole lot more.

"The actual birth was crazy," she said. “It was literally twice the work, twice the amount of time.”

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