New bike lane could be named after cyclist killed riding up Claremont Access

A new bike lane in Hamilton could be named after a cyclist who was struck and killed while riding up the Claremont Access in 2015.
Prince of Wales kindergarten teacher Jay Keddy was struck and killed on the Claremont Access in early December. His death may lead to changes that might make travel on that stretch of road safer for cyclists. (Twitter)

A new bike lane in Hamilton could be named after a cyclist who was struck and killed while riding up the Claremont Access in 2015.

Fifty-three-year-old Jay Keddy, who was an avid cyclist, teacher and father of three, was struck from behind and killed in December of 2015.

Councillor Terry Whitehead will present a motion during tomorrow's city council meeting to name the new lane "Keddy Access Trail."

Construction of the $2 million bike lane up the escarpment is to begin next year.

Last September, Guy McPhee, the man who was found guilty of careless driving in Keddy's death was fined $2,000, given an absolute driving prohibition for 120 days and 120 hours of community service over a 12-month probation period.

McPhee, 57, was behind the wheel of his pick-up truck when he struck and killed Keddy, 53, a Hamilton teacher and father of three who was riding up the access at dusk on Dec. 2, 2015.

With files from CBC News