Tony Caterina to run as PC candidate in Edmonton

Edmonton city councillor Tony Caterina will run for the Alberta Progressive Conservative party in the upcoming provincial election.

City councillor represented northeast Edmonton since 2007

Premier Jim Prentice introduces city councillor Tony Caterina Thursday as the Tories' "star candidate" in Edmonton-Beverley-Clareview. (Kim Trynacity/CBC)

Edmonton city councillor Tony Caterina will run for the Alberta Progressive Conservative party in the upcoming provincial election.

Premier Jim Prentice introduced Caterina as the party's "star" candidate Thursday.

Caterina said he was offered the candidacy on Sunday night, and had made up his mind by the next evening.

"This decision was not a difficult one for me to make," he said.

He said the Prentice government's work on the Municipal Government Act and the big city charters made him want to get behind the premier.

"This government is absolutely receptive to all views from all Albertans in all constituencies."

Caterina, who has represented northeast Edmonton on council since 2007, said once the election is called he will suspend his salary, but continue to participate in council meetings.

Caterina will be up against NDP MLA Deron Bilous in Edmonton-Beverly-Clareview.

Even though he'll be facing an incumbent, he still said he has the home-side advantage.

"This has been my end of town for the past three years as a city councillor," he said.

Asked when the election will be called, Prentice would only say,"I think we should all enjoy the Easter weekend."

Caterina is the second sitting councillor who has announced his intention to run for a higher level of government.

In February, Coun. Amarjeet Sohi declared his candidacy for the Liberal Party of Canada in the next federal election.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.