The registered owner of a black SUV suspected in the fatal hit and run that killed a Good Samaritan on Anthony Henday Drive turned himself into police on Thursday.

A vehicle with substantial damage on its right fender was recovered in a residential area in southwest Edmonton around 7 p.m. Thursday after police obtained a search warrant, Staff Sgt. Erik Johnson said.

Andrew Green, 46, was helping a stranded motorist and placing safety triangles on the shoulder of the road when he was struck by a passing vehicle around 11:30 p.m.

He was killed instantly. The driver of the vehicle did not stop.

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This photo was tweeted by Stuart Parsons on Thursday evening. He said the image was taken by a friend. (Twitter)

Green was from Toronto but relocated to Edmonton six months ago at the urging of his friend, Teru Skinner. Skinner says his friend of 20 years had gone through a divorce and was looking for a fresh start in life. 

"There's a range of emotions that goes up and down, through the day," Skinner said. "It ranges from sadness to anger."

Skinner says helping people was what Green did best.

"Always took the time to help both his friends and people who weren't his friends," he said. "Anyone who needed a shoulder, he was willing to provide it. Sometimes when a person does all that and the bad thing happens, it just seems very unfair."

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Police investigate the scene of a hit-and-run on Anthony Henday late Wednesday. Andrew Green was helping a stranded driver when he was hit and killed by what police believe was an SUV. (CBC)

Andrew's father, Merrit Green, described his son as kind-hearted. Andrew, he said, had three sisters and was his only son.

Green called on  the driver should go to the police.

"My advice is, that person should just go give themselves up," he said. "One way or the other, they're going to find him."

Police had asked the public to notify them if they come across a vehicle with damage to the right bumper, lights, fender and windshield.