The high-school physics teacher who refused to go along with his school’s "no zero" policy will meet with the public school superintendent Monday to discuss the fate of his job.

"Ideally, I want to have my job back," said Lynden Dorval. "I want to go back to teaching- go back to what I was doing before."

Dorval has been on indefinite suspension from his job at Ross Sheppard High School for ignoring the school’s policy of not giving a mark of zero for assignments that students don’t hand in. Instead, the policy is to mark the assignment incomplete.

Dorval argues that the policy doesn’t prepare students for life after graduation.

"I'll discuss my policy... with my students and why I feel that although I am going against the directive of the principal, I still don't accept his authority to give me this kind of direction."

Dorval added that it has been tough, it’s the first September in 35 years that he has not been in the classroom teaching.

At a meeting Monday, Dorval was accompanied by a friend and retired teacher, Doug Senuk.

Senuk wondered why this happened to his friend.

"Why not me and why Lynden," said Senuk, who also opposed the no-zero rule, along with Ross Sheep and with no consequences.

"Well I guess that’s a law case waiting to happen."

The school board says it can't comment on this specific case because of privacy concerns. But the board welcomes the public to the next school board meeting — which is scheduled for Tuesday.

"It's an emotional issue. We understand that people are interested and talking about their views and opinions, said Cheryl Oxford, director of communications for the Edmonton Public School Board.

"I think the most important thing is for people to be able to reflect their views and be able to look at all sides of the information if they can."

Parents show support

Since the suspension, he has received widespread support from the public — which he thinks will be in his favour.

Concerned parent Cindy Sanche waited outside the private meeting Monday, selling T-shirts for charity. The writing on the T-shirts said: "Real Heroes Give Zeros."

"I hope it gets overturned and I know a lot of people feel the same way," Sanche said. " They’re really not sending a great message to us parents out there and they’re really not doing the children any favours."

Dorval hopes this is resolved soon and that his job is safe.

"It's bad enough that I've been suspended but I think the reaction will be even more severe if it does come to termination," Dorval said. "So I think the superintendent, I'm sure, is thinking very hard about whether he's willing to go that route or not."

A representative for the superintendent tells CBC News that a decision will be made in the near future.