Premier Notley offers few hints about throne speech

Premier Rachel Notley is providing few clues as to what will be in the upcoming throne speech on Monday, except to say what the party talked about during the campaign will feature prominently.

Notley supports 'pay-before-pump' law but says don't expect it soon

Alberta Premier Rachel Notley said she personally supports pay-at-pump legislation, but said it requires consultation before her government can consider introducing it. (CBC)

Premier Rachel Notley is providing few clues as to what will be in the upcoming throne speech on Monday, except to say what the party talked about during the campaign will feature prominently.

During an interview with the CBC's Mark Connolly she said details on increasing corporate tax rates, a major plank in her election platform, will come "sooner rather than later."

Another priority of the party's campaign was increasing minimum wage to $15 by 2018, a promise that Notley said her government will keep and is actively taking steps to adjust given that she and labour minister, Lori Sigurdson, are meeting with industry representatives today.

"What we do know is we have to make changes gradually and give people lots of notice," she said. 

Notley said the government has to make a decision about next year's minimum wage by the end of June in order to implement the new rate by Oct.1.

While on the morning show she was asked whether she supports pay-before-pump legislation, given the recent death of a gas station attendant in Calgary after she tried to stop someone from stealing $113 worth of fuel.

Notley said she personally supports legislation that forces people to pay before filling up, such as what currently exists in B.C, but said there needs to be more consultation before legislation is introduced here.

"As we go forward understanding that health and safety is a critical area that needs review in this province, that issue will absolutely be put forward," she said adding that she watched people drive and dash while she worked at a gas station in high school.

Notley was elected premier 37 days ago, and admitted it's been a big shift both professionally and personally.

"I'm still getting used to the fact that security people periodically show up and take me places," she joked about the changes to her personal life.

The first session of the 29th Alberta legislature will begin on June 15 with a speech from the throne at 3 p.m. CBC will be livestreaming this event. 

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.