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Sebastien Berube is shown leaving a police disciplinary hearing in Edmonton on Friday. ((CBC))

A constable was dismissed from the Edmonton Police Service at a disciplinary hearing Friday after he was earlier found guilty of nine disciplinary charges under the Police Act.

Sebastien Berube was found guilty on disciplinary charges in three separate incidents, which included leaving two waitresses from a strip club alone in the police headquarters' constables lounge in 2005.

"Constable Berube has demonstrated a consistent lack of judgment, a lack of integrity and a consistent failure to exhibit the values and character traits that a police officer needs to fulfill his role in society..."  the presiding officer, Calgary Police Insp. Paul Manuel, wrote in a 55-page decision.

"Based on the evidence I have heard and seen throughout these proceedings, I am convinced that Constable Berube's behavior will not change. You cannot rehabilitate judgment, integrity and values. He has not demonstrated the ability nor a willingness to change."

On Friday, Berube's lawyer, Tom Engel, called the hearing process unfair and said he was not surprised by the decision.

"I recall when this thing first started, before the first witness testified, I told Sebastien, you're going to be found guilty of everything and you will be fired because the EPS is very driven to get you," he said.

Engel said he planned to file an appeal with the Law Enforcement Review Board.

Berube was found guilty of one charge of insubordination and three counts of deceit in Sept. 2008, in relation to the incident with the waitresses in the licensed constables' lounge.

In another matter, Berube was also found guilty of two counts of discreditable conduct in May 2009 for having two open bottles of beer in his vehicle and disobeying a police officer and resisting arrest on Whyte Avenue during the 2006 Stanley Cup playoffs. Berube was off-duty at the time.

In August 2009, Berube was found guilty of one count of deceit and two counts of corrupt practice following an off-duty car crash in Nov. 2005 which he was involved in — for making false statements on a collision report form and threatening the other driver and her insurance company that she would be charged for driving without insurance if the settlement wasn't at what he felt was an acceptable amount, according to the decision.

Berube had been a police officer four years when he was first suspended without pay in 2006.