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Candidate profile: Kristine Acielo

A candidate who says she has been campaigning for the last three years, Kristine Acielo is looking for an expanded arena project funded by foreign dollars.
(CBC)

Although Kristine Acielo claims she has been campaigning for the last three years, she is the candidate with the lowest profile out of the six looking to become Edmonton’s next mayor.

Acielo made her public debut at the first of the three official city-sponsored candidate forums last week.

This week, she caused a stir on social media when she stated, via a candidate questionnaire, that she would build a Skytrain around Anthony Henday Drive.

That isn't her only controversial, and some would say unrealistic, position.

In order to accommodate the city's growing population, Acielo believes that Edmonton should build a downtown arena double the size of the current project.

“For the current budget of $450 million, we’re only getting that?” she said.

“We need new re-bids where companies are going to have to come in as partnership, what not, Katz Group are going to have to put up more funding, and see if we can get some foreign investors on this as well and just help make a massive arena.”

Acielo says that these foreign investors could also fund her Skytrain proposal, which she says could turn into an attraction.

Acielo calls herself the “network queen”’ and claims to personally know more than 6,000 people.

“Tons of people that I know that have got tons of money,” she said. 

“They just need to put it somewhere. Why not Canada? Why not Edmonton?

"They've set aside a fund out in Saskatchewan, already."

Acielo is single with one 17-year-old daughter. She was born in Edmonton and says she is working towards a law degree.

The candidate says she is involved in a real estate business as well as the sales and marketing departments of other companies.

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