Mahamed Ali Abdulle was given a life sentence with no parole eligibility for 13 years in the murder of Centre High School student Emmanuel Amoah, 19, in September 2010.

Abdulle, one of four people charged in Amoah's death, was found guilty of second-degree murder and offering an indignity to human remains.

In delivering her sentence, Court of Queen's Bench Justice Beverly Browne said that Abdulle's life was "out of control" at the time of what she described as a "brutal killing."

"He had a profound disrespect for the lives of others," she told the courtroom. "A profound disrespect for the laws of our society and ... a profound disrespect for the police and courts."

"Now he will pay for that with many years in jail."

Crown Prosecutor Melanie Hayes-Richards told reporters afterwards that she was pleased with the sentence.

"There were some aggravating factors involved in this case ...including exaggerating about what happened during this offence and bragging to friends about his involvement, which the crown took the position was a commentary on his character and his future possible dangerousness."

Abdulle also received a two-year sentence for offering an indignity to human remains which he will serve concurrently.

Victim shot in the face and strangled

Amoah's body was found near Ellerslie Road and 17th Street, 12 days after he was last seen leaving school.

Several people were target shooting at a clearing in the area when events turned violent and Amoah was shot in the face, held down and beaten.

Court heard that Abdulle held Amoah's legs while another person strangled him. Abdulle then dragged Amoah's body into the woods, covering it with leaves.

During the sentencing hearing, the judge pointed to Abdulle's "chilling" lack of remorse and refused to believe any of his testimony that couldn't be verified independently.

Three youths were also charged in the murder. One youth pleaded guilty and was sentenced in February to four years in custody and three years probation.

Two others are scheduled to be in court in February 2013.

With files from the CBC's Scott Lilwall