A University of Alberta law professor wants an apology from a Conservative candidate after he says he was advised to "renounce his heritage" if he is worried over the new citizenship law's possible effect on his children.

Ubaka Ogbogu recently greeted Edmonton Centre Conservative candidate James Cumming on his doorstep, and was eager to talk about the Strengthening Canadian Citizenship Act, or Bill C-24.

The law allows the federal government to revoke Canadian citizenship from people convicted of terrorism, espionage or treason — provided they are also citizens of a second country.

Ogbogu is worried his two young girls, who were born in Canada but have dual citizenship, could be sent to Nigeria, where he was born, if he were ever implicated in a terrorist act or even a less serious crime. 

"He really didn't have any response to that when I pushed him on the fact my daughters would lose their citizenship," Ogbogu said.

"He then said to me if the law was a concern to me, I should renounce my heritage and I'll be OK," he said. "Those were his exact words.

"I was dumbfounded"

It was something he never expected to hear when he came to Canada 13 years ago, he said.

"It's ridiculous to suggest that a multicultural country in a liberal democracy where people come here and bring their different cultures, different perspectives to make this country great, that he should suggest to me that because some stupid law that's been passed by his government, that I should renounce my heritage."

Ogbogu wants an apology.

"I don't think he was expecting to run into a law professor who had read his bills and who knew what he was talking about and would push him about it.

"But it was an unguarded moment of real honesty from him."

Tory candidate denies allegations

Cumming would not return calls. His campaign organizers initially issued a statement saying he stands by Bill C-24. On Wednesday afternoon, Cumming released a statement denying Ogbogu's allegations. 

"The statements attributed to me are completely false," the email said.

"I merely explained to the individual that Bill C-24 only allows for revocation of citizenship from individuals convicted of the most serious acts of disloyalty to Canada (terrorism, treason, spying, or taking up arms against Canada), and that unless he was planning on committing those acts, he had absolutely nothing to worry about."

Federal NDP Leader Thomas Mulcair, who was in the Edmonton area Wednesday, said he was disturbed by reports of the conversation between Cummings and Ogbogu.

Mulcair, a dual citizen of Canada and France, called Cumming's advice contemptible. 

"That's abject, but it's a continuation of Mr. Harper's identity politics," he said. "That's the dangerous game he's been playing throughout this campaign."